Tag Archives: Genever

Dust. A new Belgian genever 2.0 style, handcrafted by Black Lion.

Belgian webdesigners from Black Lion said 'to hell with gin' and decided to make genever instead. A very modern tasting genever, that is or genever 2.0, as they call it. Dust was born. Also you need to know that "dust" is actually a Flemish dialect word for "thirsty".

The story starts when a web design company named: Black Lion moves its offices to an old grain distillery in Kortrijk. A new name, a new building, a fresh start. So they decided to celebrate this appropriately. At first they wanted to make their own gin, but they realised soon that there’s probably one too many gins on the market today. No shit Sherlock. If you still want to make a gin these days you better make sure it is better than very, very good.

So genever it was going to be. Why, you ask? Well, because it is the much richer grandfather of gin of course and because genever is starting to attain a substantial amount of “hipster cool”, especially in the States. Aaaaand besides waffles, sprouts and chocolate it is one of our national delicacies of course. The next thing they needed was a master distiller of this delicacy and soon they found Patrick Van Schandevijl of De Moor Distillery, famous for his Dirk Martens malt wine, genever, ‘korenwijn’ and ‘roggewijn’. His genever, by the way, is already distributed in the States under the name of Diep9.

DUST foto 3

And then there was “Dust”. It comes in a very nice black, modernised earthenware genever jug (500ML/38%ABV). Dust is created through the combination of 2 malt wines: a) a double distillate from barley, wheat, malt and rye aged for one year in used oak casks and b) a double distillate made 100% from malted barley, aged for more than 2 years on used French oak casks. This mixture was enriched by botanicals typically used in today’s gins: juniper (duh!), coriander, angelica, lemon peel, cinnamon, licorice, cubeb pepper, grains of paradise, iris, cardamom, orange peel, cumin, nutmeg and aniseed.

DUST foto 1

The result is another miracle of balance by Patrick Van Schandevijl. It is at the same time fresh, citrusy, peppery and on the other hand deep, rich and malty. Delightful to drink neat or over ice, but also works very well in cocktails (we made a very yummy Martinez with it). So, tired of gin and tonic, but still thirsty? Get Dust!

More info: www.dustjenever.be

 

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Home made vermouth by De Lijsterbes

De Lijsterbes is a famous star restaurant in the little Belgian village of Berlare where master chef Geert Van Der Brugge composes culinary masterpieces in a cosy, laid-back atmosphere. Natural, healthy and approachable are the keywords of his concept. Fine dining is for everybody and so De Lijsterbes becomes an openminded food sharing community. Now, Geert knows that the best thing to accompany a beautiful dish is a wonderful drink, so the master chef decided to make one. His own home-made vermouth.

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We like the rather atypical bottle design. It reminds us of the large medicine bottles in a pharmacy. The label is very minimal, at the back we can read some of the botanicals included in the vermouth. The label round the neck offers a serving suggestion, in this case: vermouth and tonic. Honestly not the first combination that sprang to my mind when I tasted it.

The nose is very herbal, medicinal almost, flowery and fresh. It reminds me of the smells you get when you’re running through the fields in spring time and especially at the forest edge where the meadows start or otherwise a very, very wild garden.

The taste has a distinct freshness, a pleasant and delicate tartness with the slightest hint of anise and a bit of ginger. It’s not sweet at all, well it has a certain sweetness, but far less than expected seeing the luscious golden, orange red colour of the drink. It has his own character and personality, which makes it difficult to categorise, it’s not sweet red vermouth, it’s not a ‘bianco’, it’s not exactly a ‘dry vermouth’ either.

Actually the first thing that sprang to mind when I took a sip was: “a refreshing, modern, dry Hippocras” with the slightest hint of wild honey and lavender even, but apparently there’s not a drop of honey in it. Also you’d expect the typical bitter tang of the wormwood, but it isn’t there. There is a bitter in it, but it’s different and we tried very hard to find out what it was, but after much ‘wailing and gnashing of teeth’ we had to ask Geert and the master chef disclosed to us that it was ‘rue’ (‘wijnruit’ in Dutch).

Diageo Worldclass Competiton Belgium Final - Brussels - 01/06/2015
In this picture: a humble cocktail writer to the left and master chef Geert Van Der Bruggen to the right, judging some World Class cocktails.

Now rue is a very fascinating herb so it seems. I had never heard of it before and had to look it up, what I found was very intriguing. Apparently it is the origin of the word ‘ruefulness’, which if I’m not mistaken means nothing less than ‘bitter regret’. It was very popular in ancient near eastern and Roman cuisine. In Istria and Italy it is used to flavour grappa, which is called ‘grappa alla ruta’. Also, it is the only medicine that could protect you from the lethal gaze of a basilisk!

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A basilisk (on the right) and on the left a weasel wearing a tutu made of rue! 

Apart from that the herb was extremely popular in witchcraft and spell making. Probably because of the peculiar characteristic that the leaves and stem can cause an irritation which results in blisters when the irritated spot is exposed to sunlight. Cats hate the plant and take a wide circle around it. The Romans believed that this was also the case with werewolves. Harry Potter would love this herb, hell he probably drinks Lijsterbes vermouth as breakfast.

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It really is a magical drink, wonderful aperitif. We love it pure over ice with a wedge of orange. We did try it with tonic and it was surprisingly good, but we believe some of the delicate herbal notes of the vermouth disappear under the tonic. We have made a particularly yummy Negroni variation with it:

  • 3cl Baelegemse Genever
  • 3cl Lijsterbes vermouth
  • 3cl Cynar

Cheers!

 

 

Trends and tipular fixings for 2016

To augur the cocktail and spirit trends for 2016 is more like horoscopes, tarot and disembowelling lamb to check their livers for strange spots. It’s not hard science. So instead we take a look at what we saw in 2015 and what we would like to see in 2016, mixed together with what we could possibly see in the future. Also we’re talking mostly about Belgium here and not the UK or USA.

Cocktail bars are slowly shedding their retro vibe

So less bowties and suspenders walking around in 1930’s speakeasies or 1920’s flapper parties, chique American Bars or Café de Paris. I still love those bars, most of them are great. In my opinion it is exactly the same thing as the old Tiki bars, where they wanted to transport you to a Polynesian island and experience a tropical vacation without leaving town. The speakeasies and retro bars want to transport you back into time and serve you 19th century cocktails in a 1930’s bar. And we enjoy that very much.

It is logical that we took a few steps back into time to relearn what cocktails, hospitality and bartending are, considering the republishing of Jerry Thomas’ recipes and the beginning of the cocktail renaissance. But after these few steps back, we’re ready to lunge forward and actually interesting times are ahead of us to see and observe the new concepts of cocktail bars that are coming. The signs were already there for a while, like for instance the influence of star restaurants which introduced new techniques, products, textures, etc… or pre batched cocktails on tap or the “highballisation” of drinking culture. You name it. One thing remains definite: the future brings new things. Sometimes so fast that we start to wonder whether the greater public will be capable in keeping up. Or will it be reserved for the few who always remain hip & trendy? The question brings us to our next observing.

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So, less of this, although these people rock!!!

Less classy, more dive bars

Don’t get me wrong, classy is fun too. It doesn’t necessarily equals stiff and boring. I can really enjoy a classy bar with waiters and bartenders dressed in starched white bowing to you in humble servitude fixing your drink with ice-cold perfection like they were performing a hart surgery. On the other hand I also love the more upbeat bars, where everything is pleasantly chaotic and the bartender looks like a tattooed hermit covered in locusts, preparing your cocktail like an Italian chef would make his personal pasta recipe. As long as the drinks, the service, the atmosphere and the company are good, people will normally enjoy themselves. All the rest depends on moods and preferences.

Interesting to notice is the fact that three of the last bars that opened here in 2015-16 are a distinct move away from the “classy” ones. You got the Dirty Rabbit – former (classy) Josephine’s – a rock n roll cocktailbar, then there are the two side projects of Jigger’s: Pony’s and Ganzerik. Pony’s is a ‘no brand’ cocktailbar with about 8 cocktails on the menu – if I remember correctly – all of them 10€. And Ganzerik is more like a local pub with beer, local food and simple cocktails. It’s on my top to visit list. All three have one thing in common: they scream “cocktails are for everybody”! And they’re absolutely right.

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The Ganzerik, cocktails for everybody (and craft beer and food and good service and happiness and …).

Considering the cocktail renaissance it’s a logical step in my opinion. Before that cocktails were nothing more than spiked lemonades and we needed to convince ourselves and the public that there was more to it than that. That a bartender was more than an underpaid school dropout, but somebody with a particular set of skills and knowledge who can do more than just fix you sickly sweet shit. That bartending is about serving people and making a visit to a bar an entire experience. Actually an entire drinking-culture became reinvented and we brought back from America and the UK: Speakeasies, pre-prohibition bars, bowties, suspenders, tattoos and awesome drinks. Amazing concepts and experiences were created, we still love them all. (cf the first observing above)

Actually the bartenders and cocktailians did their best so hard that it scared some people away (apparently) who thought it was too classy for them or misunderstanding that most of those “bar rules” are written in great fun and mostly mere suggestions. (The bartender is not going to flip a shotgun from under the counter and shoot your head off when you start talking into your cell phone. He might do that in his mind, you see but he’s not going to spit in your drink. If the conversation is a hindrance to other customers he will ask you to continue your phone call on the terrace or something.) Some people got scared that they would misbehave in some way or another. Or think it’s just for the rich people, it’s too expensive (those people prefer to sip on their Malibus, Pisangs and Safaris somewhere else).

I actually remember one person who asked the oft repeated question: “where can I get a good cocktail?”, I answered by naming and describing a well known Belgian cocktail bar whereupon she interrupted me, gasping: “Oh, no! That’s the bar where you have to ring the door and then they put you in the cellar!” I replied: “Well you make it sound horrible, but it’s actually quite enjoyable. They’re the nicest people with the best drinks you can imagine!” Large hazel eyes stared at me in doubt and disbelief. “Am I not underdressed for the place?”, she squeaked. My turn to blink in disbelief at the late twenty-something lady, my eyes snapped 160cm down and back up again. “Look, you don’t have to worry about that at all, nobody has to, actually. You can walk in there sporting a mohawk, 21 different face piercings and a stench-core punk shirt and they will still serve you!”.

And I heard more comments like that on cocktail bars in general. These people are mistaking obviously, but it doesn’t stop the bartender/owner – creative as he/she is – to think about some solution. And the “solution” is simple: create a “normal” dive, beer, people, music bar and serve cocktails too, apply everything you’ve learned about hospitality and tada! I think Attaboy in New York was the first to come up with the idea one or two years ago and now it’s here. Here end the two most important observings, what follows are just a few points you should remember.

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The “future” and cocktails beautiful pictures, featuring Pony’s by Jiggers Ghent.

Low alcohol cocktails will continue

Yes they will. We’re practically forced to. Considering insane taxations on spirits and the delusional political opinion that when you’ve had 2 ounces of navy strength rum you’ll step into your four-wheeled killing machine and mow down an entire village. Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against low alcohol cocktails, I love them, but I just hate the reason why people tremble in fear at high or even normal proof spirits. It’s not their fault though… money is. Anyways, there’s a lot of creative and exquisite low alc cocktails around now, so you can safely drink two or three.

Not another gin

I’m sorry, but I’m good with what’s on the market and frankly there’s so much derivative work that they’re almost making categories for it. Remember how we f***ed up genever?

In regards to gin, I don’t want a vodka that smells like bath salts or potpourri. I don’t want a miscreant distilled from the garbage they even wouldn’t dare to give to cattle mixed up with a dozen disgusting aromatic oils to – literally – cloud the bad base product in the first place. “Here’s shit covered in flowers, thank you for your 40€!”. I want juniper berries and a few other botanicals in a smooth distilled product made from quality grain. But that’s just my opinion… you know, Gin! Not something else. I love the few beer distillations that are going round, but please, stop calling them gin! It’s not. Invent another name, another kind of spirit, maybe?

Ginger ale

They call it the new tonic, well f*** you, it isn’t. It’s ginger ale. And it’s good. And more and more companies are creating their own, which is good. But if somebody starts to add flowers or whatever to it to create “that very distinct and unique ginger ale” then please reconsider. Ginger ale is a fantastic product and you can make great cocktails with it.

Agave drinks

Mezcal and tequila will keep their steady, slowly rise. There’s a recent book by Kobe Desmet and Isabelle Boons that introduces you to this spirit if you want to know more about it. Mezcal is amazing and a bartenders favourite for over two years now.

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Easy written and complete information on your favourite agave spirits

Single serves

This is something I’d like to see in bars in the future. Just a single spirit, a little tweaked up regarding the taste of the customer. I started doing this with genever, stirred a few seconds over ice and served straight up with a lemon twist and a scrape of nutmeg. It’s amazing and you can think of thousands of variations using any spirit you have. It’s well worth a try.

O’de Flander Geneverfestival shows extreme versatility of Flemish Master Distillers and their favourite product

O’de Flander is an organisation that safeguards,showcases and promotes the loveliest local product of East Flanders: genever. Both a quality label and a brotherhood they organise a festival each year to promote their genevers to the public and all the things you can do with them, like for instance cooking or cocktails. The Cocktail Nation was asked to make some genever cocktails.

Genever is a spectacularly rich spirit with a fantastic array in flavours similar to gin ( duh), whisky (duh) and in one case even rum like. Products like the Vintage 1997 from Filliers distillery and the XO Founders Reserve by De Moor distillery are brilliant and I was happily surprised to see quite a few of the distilleries sporting these long aged whiskey  like genevers. Also almost all of them have started to make their own gin or even more than one. I love the way they speak about this, they shrug their shoulders, look you in the eye and say “why not”. Most of these gins are amazing too by the way. Last one I tasted was the Hertekamp gin, if you ever have the chance then taste and try it.

Explaining about genever cocktails... although it looks like something else... love that picture :)
Explaining about genever cocktails… although it looks like something else… love that picture 🙂

Actually it was quite impressive to see all these different kinds and types of spirits spread out over the tables. These guys make everything! Spirits, liqueurs, anything! I have visited old whiskey distilleries, gin distilleries, rum distilleries and so on, having generations of experience and craftsmanship in creating their drink. But these people have 100 or 200 years of experience in distilling everything. It is amazing really, to speak to these people about some old liqueur only to see them reaching behind the counter, saying: “you mean this one?”.

Sophie Doutreligne and me prepping the first cocktail
Sophie Doutreligne and me prepping the first cocktail

So we set out to make three different genever cocktails. The location  was the ‘Meat House’ near castle ‘Gravensteen’ in the medieval city centre of Ghent, a beautiful – if somewhat chilly – location. The weather was shite, perfect circumstances for the consumption of genever. We set up en prepared for the first cocktail and I was a little bit anxious because I needed a sourdough bread to make a food pairing with my first cocktail and there’s a lot of different styles of sourdough bread and also the quality ranges from “bweeeeuurk!” to “waw, that’s amazing!”. Now, apparently one of the organisers was a bakery teacher and he had made an Italian style sourdough bread with a 12year old sourdough, he told me. People, readers, this bread was amazing!

the red one in the foreground is the Dirk Martinez
the red one in the foreground is the Dirk Martinez

The first cocktail is called “Nen Deugeniet”, in Dutch – or rather – Flemish dialect, this means a naughty boy or girl. The drink somehow reminds me of cold winter mornings with a low sun, reflecting her blinding light on snow-covered fields lined with pollard willows. The drink is dedicated to my late Grandfather who had the reputation of being very naughty (in a friendly way). The base of the cocktail is a 5 year old Filliers genever, fantastically smooth and full of flavour. Added to that is an equal part of Kummel. Kummel is an old liqueur made from caraway and cumin seeds, which give it  an anise flavour. It originated in the Low Countries and was very popular in Prussia and Russia. It is still popular in Scotland, at least in certain Golf Clubs, where they have a shot of Kummel before they take their first swing. The story goes that they brought it with them from Holland after WWII.

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So genever and kummel, both old heroes from the Low Countries, our countries. Mixed in equal parts and stirred over ice. Not too long, you don’t want to dilute it too much. Strained and served with a lemon twist. Accompanied with a little side dish of sourdough bread smeared with an abundant layer of salted butter. (We used Kummel made by De Moor Distillery)

The second cocktail was a Martinez variation, made with Dirk Martens genever. Dirk Martens is a famous 16th century humanist from Aalst, who introduced the art of printing in the Low Countries and a personal friend of Erasmus and Thomas More. So the Dirk Martinez is made with 5cl Dirk Martens genever, 3cl Martini Gran Lusso, a dash of Luxardo Maraschino and two dashes of orange bitters. Serve with an orange twist.

The last cocktail was a variation on Jerry Thomas’ Improved Gin Cocktail. The base for it was a 54% ABV Balegemsche Genever from Van Damme distillery. This distillery is the last surviving farmer’s distillery in the entire country. We used to have hundreds, but wars and so called “government” destroyed them. It is a fantastic genever, it has grassy notes – almost hay – that marry it so smoothly with the juniper berries and the rye. So we used 6cl of it. A hefty dose or in our language “ne goeien dreupel” :). Then 0,5cl of simple syrup, one dash of Luxardo, one dash of absinthe and two dashes of Jerry Thomas bitters. Well stirred over ice and strained and served neat, no garnish. This cocktail was everyone’s favourite. And I can see why…

Cheers!

More info on O’de Flander

 

Genever is one of the most coveted spirits in American craft cocktailscene

It seems that our national spirit is slowly gaining a great deal of (re)appreciation in the States. Every self respecting cocktailbar in America is dusting off that specially reserved place on the backbar for the Queen Mum of all gins. In fact they want it so much that they are starting to make their own.

It is not surprising that this beautifully rich and malty spirit is getting more and more attention in the US, after all they imported 6 times more genever than gin in the 19th century. Famous barchaeologist David Wondrich tells us that London Dry style gins weren’t distributed in the States before the 1890’s. Which leads us to the safe conclusion that every gin recipe in the glorious 1862 edition of Jerry Thomas’s cocktailbible was made with either Genever or Old Tom Gin. In the 1887 revision of Thomas’s book the gin types are specified with the recipes: 8 call for Old Tom and no less than 12 ask for “Holland Gin” or “Dutch Gin”, which is the very practical American way to pronounce “Genever”.

Filliers Vintage 1990 Genever
Filliers Vintage 1990 Genever

Why so much Genever, you ask? Well it has been a very (if not the most) popular tipple in Europe for centuries and also, if you remember, ‘Old New York’ was once called ‘New Amsterdam’. No need to explain that the Dutch colonists and sailors of the VOIC (Dutch East India Company) brought with them their precious Genever. And the sweet mother of gins became part of Manhattan’s imbibing culture up untill the 1890’s.

Bols Corenwyn
Bols Corenwyn

So what we see today is kind of a REdiscovery. And it needn’t not to baffle us, considering contemporary cocktailrenaissance happening globally for the last 15 years. Where cocktailians, bartenders and barchaeologists are passionately dedicated to rediscover anything ancient and old, but definitely booze related. So it is not quite unlogical that after gin they start to glance curiously at Gin’s old progenitor.

One of 2 Belgian imported Genevers in The States
One of 2 Belgian imported Genevers in The States

And some of them didn’t leave it to curious glances, but gladly jumped into the haystack with the Queen Mum Of All Gins. Loving her so well that they are starting to make their own. A fact which we preceive as a little dash, since we did our damnest best to protect our Genever i.e. with an AOC and lots of laws (in very short: it is forbidden to produce – or at least call it genever – outside of Belgium and The Netherlands). We are starting to doubt the use of an AOC if you can bypass it easily by calling it “Genever Style Gin”, or “Geneva Gin”, but it’s indeed probably cheaper to make your own. Although in The Netherlands and Belgium Genever is cheaper than most gins…

 

Genevieve - American Geneva from the people who also make Junipero Gin
Genevieve – American Geneva from the people who also make Junipero Gin

Anyway, here are two of our favourite Genever based cocktails:

The Dirk Martinez

The Dirk Martinez
The Dirk Martinez

Named after the Humanist philosopher Dirk Martens – personal friend of Erasmus and Thomas Moore –  who introduced ‘printing’ in the Low Countries. Also the name of a very fine Genever from my hometown.

  • 6cl Dirk Martens Korenwijn Genever
  • 3cl Red Vermouth (Carpano Antica Formula)
  • 1 or 2 dashes of Orange Bitters
  • 1cl Luxardo Maraschino

Stirr over ice and strain into pre-chilled antique champagne coupe, garnish with orange zest.

The Malty Contessa

Basically a Genever Negroni, but instead of it being the famous Count Negroni’s favourite tipple, it became the Malty Contessa.

  • 3cl Genever
  • 3cl Red Vermouth
  • 3cl Campari

Build up over ice in a rock’s glass, garnish with orange or lemon zest.

And we leave you to your booziness with the following:

In our own opinion when you would compare every modern crafted London Dry to this: 

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Fast, slick and seldom used to its full potential

Then Genever is more like this 

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Old, slow, blows everything away and has become a museum now, but who knows… maybe they take her out for a ride some time.

 

Cheers!