Category Archives: Trends

Dust. A new Belgian genever 2.0 style, handcrafted by Black Lion.

Belgian webdesigners from Black Lion said 'to hell with gin' and decided to make genever instead. A very modern tasting genever, that is or genever 2.0, as they call it. Dust was born. Also you need to know that "dust" is actually a Flemish dialect word for "thirsty".

The story starts when a web design company named: Black Lion moves its offices to an old grain distillery in Kortrijk. A new name, a new building, a fresh start. So they decided to celebrate this appropriately. At first they wanted to make their own gin, but they realised soon that there’s probably one too many gins on the market today. No shit Sherlock. If you still want to make a gin these days you better make sure it is better than very, very good.

So genever it was going to be. Why, you ask? Well, because it is the much richer grandfather of gin of course and because genever is starting to attain a substantial amount of “hipster cool”, especially in the States. Aaaaand besides waffles, sprouts and chocolate it is one of our national delicacies of course. The next thing they needed was a master distiller of this delicacy and soon they found Patrick Van Schandevijl of De Moor Distillery, famous for his Dirk Martens malt wine, genever, ‘korenwijn’ and ‘roggewijn’. His genever, by the way, is already distributed in the States under the name of Diep9.

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And then there was “Dust”. It comes in a very nice black, modernised earthenware genever jug (500ML/38%ABV). Dust is created through the combination of 2 malt wines: a) a double distillate from barley, wheat, malt and rye aged for one year in used oak casks and b) a double distillate made 100% from malted barley, aged for more than 2 years on used French oak casks. This mixture was enriched by botanicals typically used in today’s gins: juniper (duh!), coriander, angelica, lemon peel, cinnamon, licorice, cubeb pepper, grains of paradise, iris, cardamom, orange peel, cumin, nutmeg and aniseed.

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The result is another miracle of balance by Patrick Van Schandevijl. It is at the same time fresh, citrusy, peppery and on the other hand deep, rich and malty. Delightful to drink neat or over ice, but also works very well in cocktails (we made a very yummy Martinez with it). So, tired of gin and tonic, but still thirsty? Get Dust!

More info: www.dustjenever.be

 

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Campari soon opens new piazza of pleasure in Antwerp: Gaspare La Piazza Dell’Aperitivo

We were invited into an old courtyard right in the centre of medieval Antwerp where Campari will open a new bar on May 5th called: Gaspare La Piazza Dell’Aperitivo. The moment we set foot in it, we fell in love with it. Tucked away from the commercial chaos of the city and her typical traffic infarct this courtyard offers the ultimate sensory experience of a relaxing aperitivo time.

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And they take this quite literally, sensory experience, we mean. Professor Doctor Malaika Brengman from Brussels University VUB, was asked to turn the courtyard into a real Italian piazza of pleasure. So every flower, plant, colour, texture, sounds or scent you might experience is especially there to relax and re-energize you, all in Italian style.

Famous bartenders and Campari Ambassadors Jan Van Ongevalle and his daughter Hannah Van Ongevalle from The Pharmacy, Knokke, designed two Campari cocktails especially for Gaspare Bar and apart from that you can of course enjoy what is now definitely this summer’s drink: the Negroni and a refreshing Campari Tonic.

Also aperitivo is nothing without food, so antipasti will be plentiful!  There will even be a shop where you can buy everything you need to aperitivo at your own place.

One more thing, when you’re in that courtyard sipping your Negroni, imagine that maybe – just maybe – 400 years ago the famous owner of this place might have sat at a table on that very same spot, discussing art and paintings with some Italian visitors…

Open from May 5th until June 30th, every Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

Doors open from 16:00h till 22:00h.

Reyndersstraat 6, Antwerp Belgium

Ciao!

 

 

Belgian Steam Gin Gets Your Engine Rolling

Another gin, you say? Yes, people don't seem to get enough of it. Which recently lead to the quaint discovery that our blood vaguely tastes of juniper. A fact which largely broadened our Transylvanian fanbase by the way. Read below why you should try Steam Gin.

Steam Gin is the product of a unique cooperation between the Van Damme Distillery, Small Distillery Lede and VDS Distillery. And there is at least one reason why we got interested in this gin, namely, it’s distilled by Van Damme Distillery…

Van Damme is better known for its fantastic genever products, especially Balegemsche Graanjenever 54° – aka: Ol’ Blue One. Further more Van Damme distillery is the only farm distillery left in Belgium. We used to have hundreds, but one law and two world wars later, there’s only one left. What’s so special about a farm distillery you wonder? Well, a farm distillery produces its spirits entirely by itself. So everything, except for the bottle, is made on the farm, beginning with the grain. They have one expression which sounds great in Flemish and much less so in English nevertheless I will enrich you with it: “Van de grond tot in de mond!”, translated this becomes: “From the soil to the mouth!”

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Van Damme Distillery Column

So, apart from growing, malting and distilling their own grain they also have on or two other special features. They use open fermentation and next to this barrel stands a huge f***ing steam engine that heats their column! It dates from 1862 and was recently completely disassembled, cleaned, lubricated and put together again. It’s quite an impressive sight and it rolls like a dream! It’s also – like you might have guessed – the origin of the name for this gin.

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A 155 years old steam engine, looks like new to us!

We especially like the bottle design, which is custom created in Italy and took longer than Caesar to arrive in Belgium apparently. The scorched cork and pewter seal are nice details. We couldn’t fathom, though, the need, reason and meaning of the motto: “we saw taste”. It’s only later, when you turn the bottle around, and read the poem on the back of the label that you see the origin – yet still not the reason – for it. In light of good taste we suggest to dispose of the motto, as well as the poem.

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Steam Gin gift box, rather nice.

The taste is rather good and well balanced, a nice mixture between flower and spice with distinct juniper and cardamom notes. It works very well in G&T with a grapefruit twist, less suitable for Dry Martinis, but surprisingly superb in Negronis and very nice neat over ice. So get steaming!

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do you like your vermouth?

If somebody offered us a vermouth and asked: "Italian or French?" We would probably answer: "A Savoyan". Because that's where they come from, the former Duchy of Savoy. Or was it Germany? And more importantly where are they now? Italy, France? Yes and Spain and a little bit everywhere actually, even Belgium has one. Vermouth is fantastic, but instead of the countless classic cocktails you can make with it or mix it with tonic, you can also drink it differently.

In most cases, years ago, when you asked somebody what vermouth is, you got the following common knowledge: ” Oh well, erm… let’s see. It’s an Italian fortified wine with lots of herbs and stuff, very nice. Oeh! And the French have a drier, white version of it. Excellent in fish sauces.” Fast forward a couple of years and the more savvy, suave and sartorial bartenders twisted their waxed moustaches and added passionately – with twinkling eyes – the following facts: it all started in the thriving city of Turin in the late 17OO’s with a gentleman called Antonio Benedetto Carpano who made it into the wonderful aperitif which we all know today. The name comes from the German word “wermut” which means ‘wormwood’ in English and is one of the defining ingredients of the drink. Etc, etc, …

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Wormwood aka Absinth or Alsem

This is all true and you’re somehow fine with it, until after a while you realise something is gnawing at you. Why would an Italian spirit vendor name his invention after the French pronunciation of the German word for one of the herbal ingredients in it. He could have called it “Assenzio”, no? Or “Vino Assenzio”. He didn’t, this later came to be the name for absinthe, you know the drink made of… yes, wormwood (officially called ‘artemisia absinthium’). Still with me?

So, why did he call it ‘vermut’? Well, we’ll never know, but the following is how we like to see it. Mister Carpano didn’t invent his drink, but rather made a personalised version of an old drink, which stopped being popular 100 years earlier: wormwood wine. More specific: German wormwood wine (from the Habsburgian Holy Roman Empire).

Now, we all know that people have been putting stuff in their wine ever since the first man accidentally squished a grape, but apparently wormwood is something particular. This goes as far as Ancient Egypt if you please (probably to try to revive erroneously mummified persons or something), then centuries later the Greeks almost made a sport out of it and left us with a couple of dozens of recipes. Then the Romans put a “made in the Roman Empire” stamp on it, mainly by conquering Greece. After that everything becomes a little hazy in the Dark Ages only for it to come back as a perfect medicine against the plague and all sorts of intestinal parasites (“worms”) and stomach aches in general. This vaguely reminds us of the origin of genever, which was also conceived as a cure against the plague in a similar fashion, only instead of wormwood you’d put in juniper berries.

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Oh noooo! Too much wormwood!!

Anyways, fast forward a couple of centuries and we arrive at the pinnacle of popularity of German wormwood wine (16th – 17th Century) and of course the Holy Roman Empire by then was stretched to its outmost borders. Guess what was part of it then? Yes, the Duchy of Savoy, including Turin and Chambéry (home of Dolin).

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The Duchy of Savoy, later to become the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia.

Wormwood wine spread widely in those days. Of course, we had our own version in Belgium and the Netherlands called “Alsem wine“. ‘Alsem‘ being the Dutch word for wormwood. Now alsem wine made his introduction into the British Isles thanks to… yes, William III, the Dutch-born king who gave the English people gin, because they couldn’t pronounce genever. Now, funny fact, they also seemed to have trouble with something as simple as the word ‘alsem’ and quickly dubbed it ‘wholesome wine‘ (which is almost the pronunciation of the Dutch word ‘alsem’). Mind you, the British already knew wormwood wine long before William III and produced it under the name of “eisel”, but they must have liked and imported alsem wine too.

In short we can conclude that practically everybody made his version of wine aromatised with wormwood and by the 16th-17th Century people started fortifying it. Until the hype died in 1700. Upon which Carpano decided to relaunch it in 1786. And with great success! By the 19th century vermouth was all over the place and the aperitif of choice. But how did they drink it?

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A famous Martini add, notice the small size of the glass (or her very large hands)

Well apparently a lot like they drink their coffee, in small amounts and standing up. On the go, as it were. We don’t really know the measurements, I think it must have been something between 3 and 6 cl, a Piedmont glass maybe (4,5cl). Later in bigger glasses when they started to add soda water. Actually I still like it this way, it is delicious on a hot summer afternoon. Soon they added drops of bitters to their vermouth and the Milano Torino was created when using Campari. Later the Americano arrived. No one really knows why they called it like that, but there are of course several theories.

  1. it has nothing to do with Americans, but refers to the Italian word for bitter “amaro”. Personally I don’t think that this one is correct, because they would have called it “amaricato” and not Americano.
  2. They called it so, because it was very popular with American tourists of those days. We doubt this one too, otherwise a lot of things would have been called “americano”, like an americano with extra cheese and olives or an americano bolognese, etc…
  3. It refers to the style of the drink, “American style“, drink. The theory goes that it being a ‘mixed drink’, a cocktail, they called it an American style drink. We like this idea better, although we don’t believe it refers to the “mixed drink” part.
  4. So we want to add a fourth theory: it is called Americano, referring to American style drink, because it was probably served in larger than usual quantities, adding soda and -more importantly- had ice (cubes) in it. Suppose they drank the first Milano Torinos like they drank their vermouth, meaning in small quantities, the amaro added literally in drops and later they would prefer their Milano Torino made the American way and ordered: “Milano Torino, Americano.”Which could later have been abbreviated to just “Americano”.

It also makes more sense when you consider the origin of the Negroni as being told by the inventor himself: Fosco Scarselli, in an 1962 interview. Fosco tells us that Count Negroni liked to drink Americanos and preferred them a bit stronger, “so I added a few drops (!) of unsweetened gin to his drink.” Then he continues: “the Count’s habit of adding a few drops of bitter (amaro) to his cocktail started to spread among the other customers and soon they were ordering ‘Negronis’.” Considering the ingredients of a Negroni we must conclude that his Americano must have been vermouth over ice perhaps with a splash of soda.

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Negroni

Anyway, ordering your “Savoyan vermouth, American style” in this day and age will get you nowhere, but you can say: “vermouth on the rocks with a splash of soda, please and an orange wheel.” And that’s how we prefer to drink it, sometimes even omitting the soda. You know vermouth isn’t just there as a mixing ingredient, it can very well carry its own. Do try it!

If you want to learn more about vermouth, be sure to read the excellent ‘Mixellany Guide To Vermouth‘ by Jared Brown & Anistatia Miller. More about the Negroni in ‘Negroni Cocktail, An Italian Legend‘ by Luca Picchi.

Cheers!

 

 

There’s no cheers without a good cause! And this week you’ll be toasting with Negronis

Today marks the start of the Negroni week. That means that until the 12th of June every Negroni consumed in the bars that volunteered for this project will result in 1€ going to a good cause. Besides that the Negroni is starting to burst out of craft cocktailbars and high end speakeasies straight into dive bars and even living rooms again. The Negroni is an immortal classic and we love it.

 

Gin has a day (World gin Day), Negroni’s got a week! An entire week from the 6th to the 12th you can drink Negronis and support a good cause at the same time. It’s perfect, I can imagine it already: “Now Honey, I know it’s 2 AM, but it’s for a good cause!”.

Seriously now, it i s already the fourth edition of this project and it is doing great. The first time in 2013 exactly 100 bars signed up to join the project, last year however in 2015, no less than 3533 bars joined the ranks. If you’d put that on a graph you’ll be painting the ceiling! 321.000 dollars were collected in 44 countries, that’s a lot of Negronis. And whether you believe it or not, our small country Belgium, scored number 5 regarding the number of bars joining the project. This week 41 countries registered to join and I am sure Belgium will do its best to toast to the “count”.

I don’t know how to describe it, but if you look at it (in Belgium), the Negroni is kinda like a “sniper hype”. A silent trend. Which is good, I think. More and more people know what a Negroni is and – very important – know how to make one. It has found its way into people’s houses again and that’s great. You know, you don’t have to be a tattooed master mixologist startender to make a decent Negroni. It’s actually quite failsafe: equal parts of gin, red vermouth and amaro (Campari). And it’s a modular recipe (aren’t they all) you can substitute almost anything with anything else as long as you have a spirit, amaro and vermouth combination. But it’s not like the G&T roller coaster hype, ordering you to put a plethora of extra botanicals in your glass, you know, as a “garnish”, or just making a f***ed up vodka and selling it to you as a gin that’s made for tonic… No, the Negroni hype is more modest, humble and real. It is a great way to dive into vermouths, amaro and the better gins.

Cheers!

 

First Belgian Bitter launched by Biercée Distillery

Belgians like their bitter they say, I say Belgians like everything. True, we love cacao, coffee, endives, sprouts, hops and others but we're also quite fond of our stew and fries, our waffles, genever, anything really. But what if some crazy Belgians said to each other: "what would happen if we put all the bitter stuff we liked into one bottle"? At Biercée distillery they don't back down from a challenge and said: " we can do that"! The result is a delicious "wolf in sheep's clothing": Biercée Bitter, the first Belgian Amaro.

What’s an Amaro

“Amaro” means bitter in Italian and refers to a certain type of herbal liqueur, namely – you guessed it – a bitter one. Traditionally people drank it after a heavy meal to help digestion. And in Italy where your dinner lasts from 17:00 till 02:00 this can be very helpful sometimes.

Is it vermouth

Well yes and no. Amaro can be made with neutral spirit, brandy or wine. When it is wine based it’s often called amaro vermouth, as is also the case with any (very) bitter tasting vermouth. Also vermouth was often taken before dinner (or between) and amaro after dinner… or between dinners depends on how you look at it of course. This kind of culinary confusion quickly led to some very famous cocktails like the Americano, Negroni and others. Which means that vermouth in combination with an amaro is truly a wonderful thing.

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Everybody knows at least one amaro

Yes, Campari, the red temptress. But there are countless others like Fernet Branca, Cynar, Averna, Aperol, Montenegro, Martini Bitter, etc, etc…

Fernet is actually kind of a subspecies of Amaro of which Branca is probably the best known.

Biercée Bitter

The  idea must have been something like, look we all like chocolate, coffee and endives let’s try to put it all into one bottle and they kind of nailed it. Apparently Belgian endives were a great inspiration and they really tried to make that work, but had to let go in favour of the fruitiness.

Let’s have a look at it. As always with Biercée the design is awesome, I think. Tall, slender bottle, nice art nouveau logo and a fun “see-through-the-bottle” back print (these are quite popular lately, aren’t they?). There are two different bottles: one has a wolf and the other a doe (a female deer). It’s really very nice, less is more, an elegant bottle, a relaxed bottle as it were.

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Biercée Bitter, Martini Rubino and Copperhead Black Batch make a delightful Negroni.

Let’s have a taste. And here it starts, the aroma is not what I expected, it smells like candy and flowers, you know things you don’t associate with bitter. It makes you think of ‘sweet’. That is also what happens first when you taste it. You taste the red fruit first, raspberries and cassis, quite sweet. And just when you think what the hell is this, it changes. Citrus comes through and makes it more and more bitter and drier. Just what you wanted. The whole experience is a continuous flavour explosion in your mouth with a very long after taste. It’s like a wolf in sheep’s clothing, first deceptively sweet and then bitter and dry.

It works like a dream in Negronis, Americanos or Spritz. You can even drink it neat over ice with an orange zest. Cocktail Nation approved!

Cheers!

 

 

Trends and tipular fixings for 2016

To augur the cocktail and spirit trends for 2016 is more like horoscopes, tarot and disembowelling lamb to check their livers for strange spots. It’s not hard science. So instead we take a look at what we saw in 2015 and what we would like to see in 2016, mixed together with what we could possibly see in the future. Also we’re talking mostly about Belgium here and not the UK or USA.

Cocktail bars are slowly shedding their retro vibe

So less bowties and suspenders walking around in 1930’s speakeasies or 1920’s flapper parties, chique American Bars or Café de Paris. I still love those bars, most of them are great. In my opinion it is exactly the same thing as the old Tiki bars, where they wanted to transport you to a Polynesian island and experience a tropical vacation without leaving town. The speakeasies and retro bars want to transport you back into time and serve you 19th century cocktails in a 1930’s bar. And we enjoy that very much.

It is logical that we took a few steps back into time to relearn what cocktails, hospitality and bartending are, considering the republishing of Jerry Thomas’ recipes and the beginning of the cocktail renaissance. But after these few steps back, we’re ready to lunge forward and actually interesting times are ahead of us to see and observe the new concepts of cocktail bars that are coming. The signs were already there for a while, like for instance the influence of star restaurants which introduced new techniques, products, textures, etc… or pre batched cocktails on tap or the “highballisation” of drinking culture. You name it. One thing remains definite: the future brings new things. Sometimes so fast that we start to wonder whether the greater public will be capable in keeping up. Or will it be reserved for the few who always remain hip & trendy? The question brings us to our next observing.

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So, less of this, although these people rock!!!

Less classy, more dive bars

Don’t get me wrong, classy is fun too. It doesn’t necessarily equals stiff and boring. I can really enjoy a classy bar with waiters and bartenders dressed in starched white bowing to you in humble servitude fixing your drink with ice-cold perfection like they were performing a hart surgery. On the other hand I also love the more upbeat bars, where everything is pleasantly chaotic and the bartender looks like a tattooed hermit covered in locusts, preparing your cocktail like an Italian chef would make his personal pasta recipe. As long as the drinks, the service, the atmosphere and the company are good, people will normally enjoy themselves. All the rest depends on moods and preferences.

Interesting to notice is the fact that three of the last bars that opened here in 2015-16 are a distinct move away from the “classy” ones. You got the Dirty Rabbit – former (classy) Josephine’s – a rock n roll cocktailbar, then there are the two side projects of Jigger’s: Pony’s and Ganzerik. Pony’s is a ‘no brand’ cocktailbar with about 8 cocktails on the menu – if I remember correctly – all of them 10€. And Ganzerik is more like a local pub with beer, local food and simple cocktails. It’s on my top to visit list. All three have one thing in common: they scream “cocktails are for everybody”! And they’re absolutely right.

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The Ganzerik, cocktails for everybody (and craft beer and food and good service and happiness and …).

Considering the cocktail renaissance it’s a logical step in my opinion. Before that cocktails were nothing more than spiked lemonades and we needed to convince ourselves and the public that there was more to it than that. That a bartender was more than an underpaid school dropout, but somebody with a particular set of skills and knowledge who can do more than just fix you sickly sweet shit. That bartending is about serving people and making a visit to a bar an entire experience. Actually an entire drinking-culture became reinvented and we brought back from America and the UK: Speakeasies, pre-prohibition bars, bowties, suspenders, tattoos and awesome drinks. Amazing concepts and experiences were created, we still love them all. (cf the first observing above)

Actually the bartenders and cocktailians did their best so hard that it scared some people away (apparently) who thought it was too classy for them or misunderstanding that most of those “bar rules” are written in great fun and mostly mere suggestions. (The bartender is not going to flip a shotgun from under the counter and shoot your head off when you start talking into your cell phone. He might do that in his mind, you see but he’s not going to spit in your drink. If the conversation is a hindrance to other customers he will ask you to continue your phone call on the terrace or something.) Some people got scared that they would misbehave in some way or another. Or think it’s just for the rich people, it’s too expensive (those people prefer to sip on their Malibus, Pisangs and Safaris somewhere else).

I actually remember one person who asked the oft repeated question: “where can I get a good cocktail?”, I answered by naming and describing a well known Belgian cocktail bar whereupon she interrupted me, gasping: “Oh, no! That’s the bar where you have to ring the door and then they put you in the cellar!” I replied: “Well you make it sound horrible, but it’s actually quite enjoyable. They’re the nicest people with the best drinks you can imagine!” Large hazel eyes stared at me in doubt and disbelief. “Am I not underdressed for the place?”, she squeaked. My turn to blink in disbelief at the late twenty-something lady, my eyes snapped 160cm down and back up again. “Look, you don’t have to worry about that at all, nobody has to, actually. You can walk in there sporting a mohawk, 21 different face piercings and a stench-core punk shirt and they will still serve you!”.

And I heard more comments like that on cocktail bars in general. These people are mistaking obviously, but it doesn’t stop the bartender/owner – creative as he/she is – to think about some solution. And the “solution” is simple: create a “normal” dive, beer, people, music bar and serve cocktails too, apply everything you’ve learned about hospitality and tada! I think Attaboy in New York was the first to come up with the idea one or two years ago and now it’s here. Here end the two most important observings, what follows are just a few points you should remember.

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The “future” and cocktails beautiful pictures, featuring Pony’s by Jiggers Ghent.

Low alcohol cocktails will continue

Yes they will. We’re practically forced to. Considering insane taxations on spirits and the delusional political opinion that when you’ve had 2 ounces of navy strength rum you’ll step into your four-wheeled killing machine and mow down an entire village. Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against low alcohol cocktails, I love them, but I just hate the reason why people tremble in fear at high or even normal proof spirits. It’s not their fault though… money is. Anyways, there’s a lot of creative and exquisite low alc cocktails around now, so you can safely drink two or three.

Not another gin

I’m sorry, but I’m good with what’s on the market and frankly there’s so much derivative work that they’re almost making categories for it. Remember how we f***ed up genever?

In regards to gin, I don’t want a vodka that smells like bath salts or potpourri. I don’t want a miscreant distilled from the garbage they even wouldn’t dare to give to cattle mixed up with a dozen disgusting aromatic oils to – literally – cloud the bad base product in the first place. “Here’s shit covered in flowers, thank you for your 40€!”. I want juniper berries and a few other botanicals in a smooth distilled product made from quality grain. But that’s just my opinion… you know, Gin! Not something else. I love the few beer distillations that are going round, but please, stop calling them gin! It’s not. Invent another name, another kind of spirit, maybe?

Ginger ale

They call it the new tonic, well f*** you, it isn’t. It’s ginger ale. And it’s good. And more and more companies are creating their own, which is good. But if somebody starts to add flowers or whatever to it to create “that very distinct and unique ginger ale” then please reconsider. Ginger ale is a fantastic product and you can make great cocktails with it.

Agave drinks

Mezcal and tequila will keep their steady, slowly rise. There’s a recent book by Kobe Desmet and Isabelle Boons that introduces you to this spirit if you want to know more about it. Mezcal is amazing and a bartenders favourite for over two years now.

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Easy written and complete information on your favourite agave spirits

Single serves

This is something I’d like to see in bars in the future. Just a single spirit, a little tweaked up regarding the taste of the customer. I started doing this with genever, stirred a few seconds over ice and served straight up with a lemon twist and a scrape of nutmeg. It’s amazing and you can think of thousands of variations using any spirit you have. It’s well worth a try.

Chambers of The Curious – a hot new Hendrick’s bar in the heart of Brussels

Located in the beautiful ‘La Pharmacie Anglaise’ and decorated by Max Colombie of ‘Oscar And The Wolf’ Hendrick’s ‘Chambers of The Curious’ really aced its Pythonesque revelry of ‘The Weird’. Also seeing that team behind the bar gives us clear evidence that the big train of Brussels Mixology is slowly starting to roll.

The place is absolutely beautiful, inside and outside. The building is actually a 19th century neo-gothique pharmacy designed by famous architect Paul Saintenoy for a famous Belgian pharmacist who sold chocolate as a medecine (he is now better known for his cooky factory that still bears his name: Delacre). If Mr Delacre would be able to see what has become of his fabulous pharmacy, he wouldn’t mind at all! The outside of the building looks like it was ripped out of a Disney movie, complete with a woman living on the upper floor who likes to chat with mirrors. The inside is warm, cosy and f***ing crowded if you arrive on a Friday night at 21hrs.

There's stairs an' rooms everywhere
There’s stairs an’ rooms everywhere

There’s an unusual labyrinthine feeling about the place, there’s always another door leading to another stairs leading to another room. An unusual experience especially since every room seems to be filled with a mixture of objects which obviously must have belonged to Mary Shelly, Terry Gilliam or an extraordinary successful cucumber producer. Some of the rooms had weird experiments going on… “Should I like to be tested?” “No, sir, thank you! I’ll try my luck at the bar!”

You set off looking for the lavatory and they send you to this...sorry mate, thought you said the laboratory
You set off looking for the lavatory and they send you to this…sorry mate, thought you said the laboratory

The bar is obviously located in the former pharmacy’s shop, complete with wooden cabinets and balcony. Behind the stick were two familiar faces, good bartenders, who both competed in the Belgian World Class Competition: Alexis Mosselmans and Ennio Campanaro. Energy, enthusiasm and 100% passion for the Craft. They form such a dynamic duo that I hereby baptise them “The Sultans of Sling” (sling is not a typo, but a type of cocktail if you were wondering). It is good to see the Brussels Cocktailbar Scene flowering and producing specimens like Alexis and Ennio. I’m sure we’ll be seeing more and more cocktailbars very soon in Brussels.

Alexis Mosselmans, original photo by Laetitia Bica.
Alexis Mosselmans, original photo by Laetitia Bica.
Ennio Campanaro, together they're the "Sultans of Sling"
Ennio Campanaro, together they’re the “Sultans of Sling”

Do go and visit, you have the chance until the end of October. It is located at Coudenberg 66, Brussels, a stone’s throw away from the Central Station. If you want to have yourself tested make an appointment.

Hendrick's -Chambers Of The Curious - La Pharmacie Anglaise, Brussels, Belgium
Hendrick’s -Chambers Of The Curious – La Pharmacie Anglaise, Brussels, Belgium
Hendrick's -Chambers Of The Curious - La Pharmacie Anglaise, Brussels, Belgium
Hendrick’s -Chambers Of The Curious – La Pharmacie Anglaise, Brussels, Belgium

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Cheers!

The Beast Is Back – Mortlach – Single Malt Whisky

It's called Mortlach and is known as the best kept secret of Scotland. It's a beast spawned from a vertically challenged witch! No, it's true! This isn't Game of Thrones, a Tolkien movie or a Harry Potter novel, this is pure Scottish reality. This is probably the best whisky I have ever tasted. Photography by Mathias Roelants.

Mortlach, I love the name. If you put an umlaut on it you have something that sounds like the loudest rockband on earth: Mörtlach! I can see the T-shirts already. Wondering where the name came from I conducted some etymological research (i.e. I Googled it) and apparently it is the old name of what is now officially known as Dufftown. Seriously, from Mortlach to Dufftown? Town of Duff? James Duff, Earl of Fife… Very modest of you James.

The Beast is in Belgium now.
The Beast is in Belgium now.

Why is it called “Scotland’s Best Kept Secret“? Because, until now, you couldn’t lay your hands on a single bottle. Except for the very rare exceptions, which were plundered immediately by those vultures called ‘collectors‘. As we speak there must exist quite a number of unopened old Mortlach bottles! Every bottle of Mortlach left unopened is a living disgrace! I hope Wee Witchie curses you all!

Mortlach ice stamp, very cool.
Mortlach ice stamp, very cool.

Wee Witchie is actually the name of the column in which the whisky is distilled. Named aptly because it’s there where the magic happens.  Mortlach has a very unique 2,81 distillation method, meaning it is distilled more than 2 times, but less than 3 times. I’ll spare you the details. It’s the Witch that gives it its unique taste, that striking balance between extremes. Sweet and dry, raw and soft, a complex magic between malt, meat and fruit. First the beast hits you and then it puts a spell on you, which remains forever. Almost like Keats’ “La belle dame sans merci”.

Georgie Bell holding a Beast.
Georgie Bell holding a Beast.

Speaking about “Belles“, the Mortlach Brand Ambassador deserves a fair mention too. Georgie Bell is probably the most perfect brand ambassador to spread the word of the Beast and the person responsible electing her for this position deserves an HR medal. When this passionate lady starts her story about beasts and witches, you become like children glued to her lips, hearing an awesome fairy tale. And then, when you taste the Mortlach for the first time, you lean back and say: “My God, it’s true”.

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Most Magical Malt In The World

The Beast Of Dufftown is now also available in Belgium. It comes in 3 forms: Rare Old, 18 Years Old and 25 Years Old. We prefer the raw finesse of the Rare Old, but only if we were forced to choose. And remember, when you buy a bottle don’t let it sit in your cabinet gathering dust, but share it with your loved ones and best of friends having a magical evening.

Cheers!

Flemish Food Bash is World’s Best Restaurant & Cocktailbar, but only for 1 day.

Ever dined in a 25 star restaurant? No? Well, neither have I, but if you're free on the 5th of July 2015, you can! A grand total of 40 chefs, together good for 25 Michelin stars and no less then 20 bartenders from the top 50 best bars in the world will gather at Oostduinkerke Beach in Belgium and seduce you with what is probably the most sensual food & booze orgy on the globe.

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It says Flemish Food Bash, but it’s not only Flander’s finest you will meet. Actually it’s quite the international crowd. An impressive global line up which turns this event in a must visit for anybody who can chew. Apart from star chefs and top bartenders, there’s also baristas, butchers, bakers and beers galore to fulfil every “burgundian” fantasy you’ve ever had.

They're from everywhere, even Greenland if you please!
They’re from everywhere, even Greenland if you please!

Let’s have a look at the bartenders:

Jigger’s, Belgium

The Pharmacy, Belgium

Marian Beke from The Nightjar, UK

Erik Lorincz from The Savoy, UK

Steve Okhuysen, Old Fashioned, Belgium

Sofie Ketels, Belgium

Didier Van den Broeck, Dogma, Belgium

Maxim Kilian, The Parlour, Germany

Roman Milostivy, Chainaya, Russia

Paul Morel, Belgium

Rémy Savage, Little Red Door, France

Gegam Kazarian, Kazaris Project, Spain

Steve Schneider, Employees Only, USA

Jurgen Nobels, Belgium (winner of Diageo World Class Belgium 2015)

Laura Schacht, Hiding In Plain Sight, Netherlands

Zoltan Nagy, Boutiq’Bar, Hungary

Gobo Hansen, Ruby, Denmark

Julia Momose, Green River, USA

Massimo Stronati, The Doping Club, Italy

Matthew Bax, Trink Tank, Austria

Check out that list, quite impressive isn’t it! And if you don’t know them then come down and meet them, because you should (especially if you’re into cocktails).

Prices for the food or a cocktail are ridiculously low, because the whole thing is a not for profit event. The value for them is to watch and learn from each other…and a killer party of course.

Well, you know where I will be on the 5th 😉

P.S. There’s also barbers, hairstylists, tattoo artists, cheese aficionados, patissiers and street artists, … Chances are very high people won’t recognise you anymore after ‘the bash’.

Flemish Food Bash

More information on:

 

http://www.flemishfoodbash.com

5th of July, Oostduinkerke Beach, Belgium

12:00 – 06:00hrs

Tickets: 30€

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